The Latest

Oct 1, 2014 / 528 notes

artchipel:

Joseba Elorza

New Scientist
Los Angeles Magazine
Invasion

Oct 1, 2014 / 257 notes

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ai Weiwei

With Wind

2014

*Photo: Jan Stürmann, courtesy FOR-SITE Foundation

Sep 30, 2014 / 11,217 notes
wildcat2030:

Earth has water older than the Sun


Not all water in the Solar System today could have formed here, researchers say.

As much as half of the water in Earth’s oceans could be older than the Sun, a study has found. By reconstructing conditions in the disk of gas and dust in which the Solar System formed, scientists have concluded that the Earth and other planets must have inherited much of their water from the cloud of gas from which the Sun was born 4.6 billion years ago, instead of forming later. The authors say that such interstellar water would also be included in the formation of most other stellar systems, and perhaps of other Earth-like planets. The dense interstellar clouds of gas and dust where stars form contain abundant water, in the form of ice. When a star first lights up, it heats up the cloud around it and floods it with radiation, vaporizing the ice and breaking up some of the water molecules into oxygen and hydrogen. Until now, researchers were unsure how much of the ‘old’ water would be spared in this process. If most of the original water molecules were broken up, water would have had to reform in the early Solar System. But the conditions that made this possible could be specific to the Solar System, in which case many stellar systems could be left dry, says Ilsedore Cleeves, an astrochemist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, who led the new study. But if some of the water could survive the star-forming process, and if the Solar System’s case is typical, it means that water “is available as a universal ingredient during planet formation”, she says. (via Earth has water older than the Sun : Nature News & Comment)
Sep 30, 2014 / 67 notes

wildcat2030:

Earth has water older than the Sun

Not all water in the Solar System today could have formed here, researchers say.

As much as half of the water in Earth’s oceans could be older than the Sun, a study has found. By reconstructing conditions in the disk of gas and dust in which the Solar System formed, scientists have concluded that the Earth and other planets must have inherited much of their water from the cloud of gas from which the Sun was born 4.6 billion years ago, instead of forming later. The authors say that such interstellar water would also be included in the formation of most other stellar systems, and perhaps of other Earth-like planets. The dense interstellar clouds of gas and dust where stars form contain abundant water, in the form of ice. When a star first lights up, it heats up the cloud around it and floods it with radiation, vaporizing the ice and breaking up some of the water molecules into oxygen and hydrogen. Until now, researchers were unsure how much of the ‘old’ water would be spared in this process. If most of the original water molecules were broken up, water would have had to reform in the early Solar System. But the conditions that made this possible could be specific to the Solar System, in which case many stellar systems could be left dry, says Ilsedore Cleeves, an astrochemist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, who led the new study. But if some of the water could survive the star-forming process, and if the Solar System’s case is typical, it means that water “is available as a universal ingredient during planet formation”, she says. (via Earth has water older than the Sun : Nature News & Comment)

Sep 29, 2014 / 2,000 notes

artchipel:

Pejac (Spain) - Miniature Silhouettes and Optical Illusions

Spanish artist Pejac creates on his window miniature silhouettes in cut paper or acrylic paint. The window is then captured on camera, showing the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope. Over the past couple of years, Pejac has been getting recognition for his simple, clever public art and gallery work. Using brushes, pencils, acrylic paint and sand paper, he creates works that blend into their surroundings using existing elements and textures. Often socially and politically engaged, his works vary from small interventions to large mural-like pieces. (src. Hi-Fructose Magazine)

© All images courtesy of the artist

[more Pejac]

poplipps:

#Goodmorning #sunshine… #Nyc #riseandshine (at Central Park)
Sep 29, 2014 / 32 notes

poplipps:

#Goodmorning #sunshine… #Nyc #riseandshine (at Central Park)

Sep 29, 2014 / 79 notes
Sep 29, 2014 / 130 notes
Sep 29, 2014 / 205 notes
usatoday:

Anything is possible with coffee. Happy National Coffee Day!
Sep 29, 2014 / 213 notes

usatoday:

Anything is possible with coffee. Happy National Coffee Day!